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Contents of IMP Journal issue 1, volume 8

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This is not a Building: the Abductionist Journey of a Publicly Funded Regional (non-)Innovation Project



Authors


Andreas Brekke, Synnøve Rubach & Thomas Hoholm

Abstract


The article starts with the intention to report research findings related to the microprocesses involved in networked innovation processes. However, it ends up with a description and critique of how a publicly funded project becomes a tool for the production of little more than new projects. The article consciously shows the abduction process underlying the research and thus provides an opportunity to learn from practice. Insights into the relations between innovation policy and innovation are outlined.


Boundary Decisions of the Firm: Make, Buy, Cooperate



Authors


Filipe J. Sousa

Abstract


Firms are not atomistic hierarchies only linked with one another at arm’s-length distance in markets. Instead, a myriad of long-lived, highly cooperative relationships between suppliers and customers are pervasively found in the B2B world. And it is within those enmeshed relationships and networks that the co-evolution of capabilities and business specialisms is brought about and developed. If that is the actual ‘topography’ of the business landscape, then the coordination of economic activities in general, and the boundary decisions of each and every firm in particular, are unlikely to be reduced to a (dual) choice between ‘making’ or ‘buying’. Inter-firm cooperation is in itself a third governance structure, in alternative to the hierarchical and the market modes of coordination. And, what is also equally important to note, it is through the make-or-buy-or-cooperate decisions that the (embedded) firm is able to change its nature and scope, redefine its (fuzzy) boundaries, and thus adapt to an ever-changing business setting.


Activity Interdependence in Industrial Networks - Exploring the Structural Interconnectedness of Activities and Resources



Authors


Lars Bankvall

Abstract


Industrial activities are never undertaken in isolation, but need to be connected to each other in order to enable the production, exchange and use of industrial products and services, and related processes. This paper focuses on this connectedness by exploring upon the interdependence existing between individual activities. Three existing interdependency typologies are drawn upon, represented in Thompson (1967), Richardson (1972), and Håkansson et al (2009). All these have been extensively used in relation to the Industrial Network Approach (INA), and are subsequently recognized as relevant starting points for further exploration. The four alternative interdependency types presented in this paper enable the description and subsequent analysis of how activities connect in industrial networks. In relation to the existing typologies within the INA, these alternative types do not only enable an increased specification of how activities actually connect to each other. They also draw upon an underlying principle of the network model (Håkansson, 1987) by exploring upon one network dimension, resources, in the analysis of another dimension, activities.


The Conceptual Model of Success in Buyer-Supplier Relationship



Authors


Aniko Bodi-Schubert

Abstract


This article focuses on to introduce the results of empirical research, which aims to create a conceptual framework on the meaning and role of success in buyer-supplier relationship’s operation and development. Related to this, a further research point is to analyze the time-dimension of success: how success changes and develops over time. The basic elements of my research are the relationships between supplier and buyer business partners, so my empirical study will focus on these dyads. At the theoretical grounding of the article I highly focused on the introduction of the appearance forms of buyer-supplier relationships and their development. Based on the research result the conceptual model of success was developed. Its most important statement is that success in buyer-supplier relationships can be understood as a subjective, organizational-level perception, which evolves following the fulfilment of both business and relationship success goals.