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Contents of IMP Journal issue 2, volume 7

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Agency and Economizing in Interacted Economies



Authors


Håkan Håkansson, Per Ingvar Olsen & Tore Bakken

Abstract


This paper discusses some core implications of the bulk of IMP research over the years for the understanding and conceptualization of what we call “interacted agency”. The discussion is also rooted in the two fundamental assumptions about resource heterogeneity and relational knowledge constraints that are essential in IMP based economic theory. Based on this, the paper portrays agency as representing self-interest in value creation processes that exploit benefits that are collective outcomes of unique interactions with others. These situations represent multiple alternatives that require complex interactions in both time and space for any actual evaluation, deciding and acting to be possible and meaningful in real economies. These characteristics of agency in real economies imply that the radical simplifications of how agency is represented in main stream economics leaves out the essence of what economic agency is about and how it works.


(Re)Organising for Interaction within Innovation Networks – An Exploratory Study in the Public Sector



Authors


Theodor Sommersten Espelid, Carla Ramos, Daniela Corsaro, Stephan C. Henneberg

Abstract


Issues around innovation have seen considerable increase of academic and managerial interest over the last decades. In parallel, the role of business relationships and networks has also attracted growing attention. Consequently, the concept of innovation networks (INs) is positioned at the interface of these two streams. At the core of the concept of INs is the proposition that relationships, i.e. interactions with other business partners, are critical for key innovation activities. However, research on INs has focused mostly on network structure-related aspects, while not providing enough insights into the processes of organising for interactions. In particular, this study explores the role of actors’ perceptions and interpretations regarding business relationships on how actors organise for innovation activities. Furthermore, this paper sheds light on the reciprocal influence that exists between cognition and action in such contexts, something that has been discussed in the field of organisational and cognitive science but not within innovation networks setting as part of business marketing studies. Longitudinal exploratory case study research was conducted, which analyses two service innovation processes in an innovation network in a district within a municipality of a North European country. Our study shows how INs evolve over time as actors shape (and reshape) the network through specific interactions within and between realms of the IN, whereby the diverse views held by different actors are confronted. In particular, we find that perceptions and interpretations of power distribution and strength of relationships emerge as relevant aspects to determine actors’ intentions toward organising both in the innovation development and the implementation phases. At the same time, the changes (such as initiation, development, and termination) in the relationships with other actors, actor groups, or realms of the IN affect the actors’ interpretations, thereby generating a recursive interpretative path through which the innovation network is shaped.


Organizational Structure, Key Account Management Orientation and Performance Outcomes



Authors


Spiros Gounaris & Nektarios Tzempelikos

Abstract


Although the importance of Key Account Management (KAM) in building long-term relationships between suppliers and customers is widely recognized in the literature, much of the previous research fails to address the values underlying effective KAM programs. The purpose of this study is to explore Key Account Management Orientation (KAMO) and test whether it is influenced by forms of organizational structure. The study also examines the effect of KAMO adoption on supplier’s performance outcomes. Findings of the empirical study indicate that more wide and flexible organizational systems will facilitate the development of KAMO within the supplier and influence the effective responses to key accounts needs. Results also indicate that KAMO positively affects financial performance indirectly through the establishment of relationship quality.